NO MAJOR ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT EXPECTED FROM GRIEG SEAFOOD CHLORINE LEAK

PUBLISHING DATE

A chemical leak at a Grieg Seafood plant in Norway is not thought likely to cause any long-term harm to the environment.

As reported by media, 96,000 salmon in a holding pen died when 15,000 litres of chlorine, normally used as part of the disinfection process at the plant, were released by accident.

While the incident had a short-term impact on plant operations, Grieg Seafood said the chlorine was likely to break down quickly in the environment, although a full assessment is taking place.

The company has asked Akvaplan-niva, a daughter company of the Norwegian Institute for Water Research, to carry out an independent investigation into the incident.

A chemical leak at a Grieg Seafood plant in Norway is not thought likely to cause any long-term harm to the environment.

As reported by Sial Paris Newsroom at the beginning of July, Grieg Seafood recently sold its operations in Shetland in northern Scotland so that it could focus on its Norwegian and Canadian interests.

The deal to transfer operations to Scottish Sea Farms, worth £164 million (€192.7 million), came after efforts to cut sea lice levels at the Shetland operations proved successful.

Grieg Seafood describes itself as one of the world’s leading salmon farming companies, and it aims to harvest 81,000 tonnes this year, excluding the Shetland operations.

Significant growth in harvests are expected, with the company targeting a harvest of 130,000 tonnes in 2025.

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